Blog Archives

Lesson in Sales from Songwiters

I’ve been in Nashville since 1975 and I’ve grown to appreciate Songwriters. I’ve never worked in the music industry but I Songwriterslike a great tune and how it relates to how I sell.

Music fans are loyal and buy their favorite songs.  There are plenty of loyal fans of products and services that are unrelated to music and they also buy.

Most songs are somewhere in length between 2 ½ and 3 ½ minutes. That’s about the attention span of the listening audience. Sure there are a few “Stairway to Heaven” exceptions and some catchy short jingles but let’s stick to the norm.

Every song has a title, however writing titles would leave a person far short of being an accomplished songwriter. Many have tried their hand at songwriting but only a few make their mark of success in this town. One reason is you can’t short cut the practice, trials and errors involved in the development process. Most just don’t have the patience, drive, and discipline needed to separate themselves from the rest of the pack.

In the end it’s the hook, melody, originality, message or some combination of the before mentioned that draws in an audience.

In sales we are taught to get to the benefits and features. Have our elevator pitch well rehearsed. Be ready to present a solution for almost every objection we’ll hear. In sales just like in a song chances are our audience needs to be pulled in one word or line at a time and on the other end the spectrum chances are if they don’t like what they hear in verse one and two you’re not going to win them over in verse three and four. You have a window of opportunity to present a song and to make a sell. You rarely win a paying customer when you rush them and rarely win them if they don’t relate to the heart of your message.

As sales people we have to find our audience and like a songwriter when we get their time and attention  be prepared to share our best.

The Buyer’s 4 Step Process

Taking pride in being a continual learner and always searching for excellent sales material I want to share Deb Calvert, President, Peoples First Productivity Solutions blog post “Sales Professionals: What about the Buyer’s Process?”

Deb keeps it simple as she explains…..

Every sales training program and book about increasing sales offers a sales process. These step-by-step processes help sellers to orient themselves and move through a logical progression from opening the sale all the way through to closing the sale.

Having a sales process is a good practice.

Knowing and following your buyer’s process is an even better practice.

The buyer’s process is simple, and it’s universal. Every time you plan to buy something, you follow exactly this same process. It applies when you’re making an impulse purchase like a pack of gum at the checkout counter. It also applies, unchanged, when you make a major purchase that takes months of research and planning.

The buyer’s process works like this:

Before anyone ever buys anything, they must first have an awareness that it exists. Further, the buyer needs to be interested in the item. If that interest builds into desire, a buyer may then (and only then!) take action to acquire the item.

 

Recapping, the buyer’s process is this:

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Like it or not, no sales process will ever operate independently of the buyer’s process. Ideally, the sales process should track right alongside the buyer’s process. A savvy seller will be tuned in to gauge where the buyer is and will recognize the early signs of interest. In response to the buyer’s interest, the smart seller will help build and magnify desire by showcasing relevant and personalized benefits. And, when the time is right, the seller will advance to a close at the moment when the buyer is ready to take action…..

For the full post:

http://www.managingamericans.com/blogFeed/What-about-the-Buyers-Process.htm